CENTRAL TEXAS BEEF SHORT RIBS

SERVES: 6–8 | PREP TIME: 15 MINUTES | COOKING TIME: 6–7 HOURS | RESTING TIME: 1–2 HOURS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT: WATER SMOKER, 4 LARGE HANDFULS MESQUITE OR OAK WOOD CHUNKS, SPRAY BOTTLE FILLED WITH WATER, INSTANT-READ THERMOMETER; DRY, INSULATED COOLER This recipe comes straight out of an epic day I spent …

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Recipe of the Week: Kanelbullar

KANELBULLAR – cinnamon buns Fika is a social institution in Sweden that essentially means having a break with one’s colleagues, friends or family and no one pastry or baked treat says fika time as much as a cinnamon flavoured bun, paired here with a touch of aromatic cardamom. Think of …

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Recipe of the Week: Grilled Peach, Beetroot & Feta Salad

Peaches don’t just have to be the stuff of smoothies and fruit salads, their aromatic flavour and smooth texture work incredibly well in savoury dishes, too. Paired with tangy goats’ cheese, salty Jamón Ibérico and peppery leaves, the sweetness of peaches makes this a salad that hits your taste buds …

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Recipe of the Week: Salmon Parcels with Vegetables

Serves 4 Preparation: 15 minutes Cooking time: 15 minutes Pre-heat the oven to 180°C. Arrange the salmon steaks, the courgettes cut in rounds and the remaining vegetables in the middle of 4 sheets of baking paper. Close the parcels tightly. Bake in the oven for 15 minutes. Sprinkle with basil …

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Top Five Cuisines for 2017

Bored of eating the same old meals every week? Be inspired to try something new with our top five up-and-coming cuisines for 2017. Ghanian Food – 2017 is set to be the year of an African food revolution, and where better to start than with fun, relaxed Ghanian cooking. From …

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Where’s the buffet gone? – Gizzi Erskine

GIZZI ERSKINE


Where’s the buffet gone? It agitates me that we only really have them during the winter festive period. How did we get here? I guess we went through a stage of embracing formal dining. With the popularity of celebrity chefs and cooking shows on TV, people are bringing the things even I find ludicrous in restaurants into the home. Going to someone’s home and having canapés, then an amuse-bouche, then starters, a main course, dessert and petits fours is my idea of hell. Trust me when I tell you that a Michelin-starred chef does not cook like this at home. This is just showing off. Your guests don’t want it. They want to feel comfortable and have your focus. And don’t get me started on canapé parties, the ultimate way of “keeping up with the Joneses”. As a trainee chef I catered for so many events like this. The same vibe at each… starving people hovering close to the kitchen, never quite getting their fill, and a room filled with people who’ve drunk too much and not eaten enough. A frantic host (or head chef in my case) never quite being on top of anything… and food that’s not as good as proper cooking!

When in my home, I want to eat family-style. Big platters filled with food that you have to help your neighbours to. A vat of something delicious placed on the table for people to fill up on, with a few complementary sides. This is how I prefer to dine… but at Christmas, when I’m entertaining more than 10 people I want a buffet!

A buffet doesn’t have to be of the retro kind, with cheese-and-pineapple hedgehogs and depressing soggy sandwiches. I truly believe that laying on a fantastic spread means you can go to town with an opulent and varied array of food. This is a much more practical way to feed larger groups. One of the best weddings I ever went to offered guests a buffet instead of a formal meal. It was beautiful, with a suckling pig, a huge platter of seafood, amazing salads… There is something so celebratory about seeing a copious display of food in front of you, which you just don’t get with formal dining. Indeed, I believe that the secret to a buffet’s success lies in this very informality. People can take what they want, and there is something so convivial about helping to serve each other. In this way I really feel it can help create a festive atmosphere.

Also, there are loads of pragmatic advantages to serving a buffet. You will undoubtedly find it cheaper to prepare than a formal meal, as you will be able to feed more people with less food, (while giving you the opportunity to use up leftovers you might have). What’s more, much of the work can be done in advance – instead of being stuck in the kitchen between courses, once the buffet’s laid out you can be part of the party and relax and enjoy the food with everyone else.

This is not to say you shouldn’t try and WOW when doing a buffet by providing a wider variety of tastes while still showcasing great cooking. The key is to have one main focus. As it’s Christmas, I’m going to use the Spiced Pineapple Christmas Ham as the main attraction. It then needs a decent terrine – I give you The Creamiest & Lightest Chicken Liver Parfait. Some Quickest Pickled Pineapple to go with each, and a Seafood Platter with the Best Marie Rose Sauce You’ll Ever Eat over ice. I take on some buffet classics such as Curried Eggs, a few salads and some carbs in the form of potatoes or simply, good bread. A cheese plate, or charcuterie for the lazy? This is still glam eating, but it’s homely and most of all it’s FUN! What’s not to like? I hereby rest my case for the resurrection of the buffet: bring it out from the Dark Ages and into the modern-day party!

Gizzi's Season's Eatings


Extracted from Gizzi’s Season’s Eatings by Gizzi Erskine.

Top 5: Dan Doherty’s Top 5 Ingredients for Autumn

We asked Duck & Waffle’s Executive Chef, Dan Doherty, for his top five ingredients for Autumn. Jerusalem artichokes Roasted with garlic and thyme, the nutty, earthy flavour gets me every time. Guinea fowl Pot roasted with pancetta and lots of onions, it’s the perfect autumnal dish Wild mushrooms This is when …

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